Stephen Pretz Jr.

Conclusions

Though we are probably many, many years away from a Smart Utopian City, it is interesting to explore what it may look like. The aspects I outlined are those that I believe to be most important in a Utopia and a true Smart City. The Utopian aspects ensure that people live in a ‘perfect’ world, free of worry and concern for outside forces. The Smart City aspects help to build a new kind of life for the people in this Utopia where life is streamlined and assisted by robots and artificial intelligence, keeping people safe and giving them the ability to go about their lives as they please. I believe the Utopia I have outlined is ‘perfect’ when implemented properly and would be a very interesting place to see.

References

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Cowen, Tyler. “How Technology Could Help Fight Income Inequality.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 6 Dec. 2014, http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/07/upshot/how-technology-could-help-fight-income-inequality.html.

Erik Fisher. (2017) Entangled futures and responsibilities in technology assessment. Journal of Responsible Innovation 4:2.

García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2018). The utopia of the technological revolution (Version 1.0). http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1403507.

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Mitchell, Timothy. “Hydrocarbon Utopia.” Utopia/Dystopia: Conditions of Historical Possibility. Ed. Michael D. Gordin, Helen Tilley, and Gyan Prakash (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010), 117-47.

Walsh, Kelly. “Kelly Walsh.” Emerging Education Technologies, 6 May 2015, http://www.emergingedtech.com/2012/11/7-ways-holographic-technology-will-make-learning-more-fun/.

Wright, Frank Lloyd, 1867-1959. The Disappearing City. New York :W.F. Payson, 1932.

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